Basic Summary for Scabies


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Main name of condition: Scabies
Other names or spellings: itch mite, seven year itch, Sarcoptes scabiei


What is Scabies?
  Brief description of Scabies: Mite infection of the skin common in institutions.
  Parent types of Scabies: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Insect parasite conditions, Mite conditions, Lice, Louse-borne diseases, Diseases contagious from sex, Diseases contagious from bedding, Diseases contagious from towels, Diseases contagious from clothing, Diseases contagious from vaginal sex, Diseases contagious from safe sex
  Organs Affected by Scabies: skin
How many people get Scabies?
  Prevalance of Scabies: common
How serious is Scabies?
  Complications of Scabies: see complications of Scabies
What causes Scabies?
  Class of Condition for Scabies: parasite insect
  Risk factors for Scabies: see risk factors for Scabies
What are the symptoms of Scabies?
  Incubation period for Scabies: For a person who has never been infested with scabies, symptoms may take 4-6 weeks to begin. For a person who has had scabies, symptoms appear within several days. You do not become immune to an infestation. 1
  Duration of Scabies: Itching may continue for 2-3 weeks, and does not mean that you are still infested. Your health care provider my prescribe additional medication to relieve itching if it is severe. No new burrows or rashes should appear 24-48 hours after effective treatment. 1
  Symptoms of Scabies: see symptoms of Scabies
Can anyone else get Scabies?
  Contagion of Scabies: Mostly by sexual contact, but also skin contact, clothing, bedding, towels, or furniture.
  More information: see contagiousness of Scabies
How is it treated?
  Treatments for Scabies: see treatments for Scabies
  Prevention of Scabies: see prevention of Scabies
Society issues for Scabies
  Hospitalization statistics for Scabies: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Scabies:
  • 0.0032% (414) of hospital consultant episodes were for scabies in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 85% of hospital consultant episodes for scabies required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 51% of hospital consultant episodes for scabies were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 49% of hospital consultant episodes for scabies were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 86% of hospital consultant episodes for scabies required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 8.3 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for scabies in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 2 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for scabies in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 37 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for scabies in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 12% of hospital consultant episodes for scabies occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 36% of hospital consultant episodes for scabies occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 4% of hospital consultant episodes for scabies were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.0053% (2,782) of hospital bed days were for scabies in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)


Footnotes:
1. excerpt from Scabies: DPD

Last revision: June 13, 2003

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