Medical News Summary: Researchers examine how to reduce toxoplasmosis encephalitis in HIV patients


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About: Researchers examine how to reduce toxoplasmosis encephalitis in HIV patients
Date: 25 November 2004
Source: Aids Map
Author: Michael Carter
Medical News Summary (summary of medical news story as reported by Aids Map): The most prevalent neurological condition in HIV patients is toxoplasmosis encephalitis, especially in those who arenít taking prophlaxis. It was also more common in HIV patients who were at a high risk of HIV progression and death. HAART has helped to greatly reduce the risk of toxoplasmosis encephalitis and hence has nearly halved the deaths due to this condition. Further studies found that the risk of developing toxoplasmosis encephalitis was reduced by previous exposure to antiretroviral therapy, the use of prophylaxis against toxoplasmosis encephalitis and a stronger immune system at the time of neurological diagnosis. This results support the idea that HAART should be used before there is a high risk of clinical progression and taking prophylaxis by immunosuppressed patients where HAART has failed.
URL: http://www.aidsmap.com/en/news/1B4C388E-E4E2-486A-ACCB-B5F76C8DA777.asp
Related Disease Topics: HIV, Toxoplasmosis encephalitis, Neurological disorder
Related Symptom Topics: Suppressed immune system

Related Medical News Channels: This medical news summary article refers to the following medical channel categories:
  • AIDS
  • death from AIDS
  • Death from toxoplasmosis encephalitis
  • Death from neurological disorder
  • medication and AIDS
  • Medication and toxoplasmosis encephalitis
  • Medication and neurological disorder
  • research and AIDS
  • Research and toxoplasmosis encephalitis
  • Research and neurological disorder

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