Prognosis of Melanoma


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About prognosis: The 'prognosis' of Melanoma usually refers to the likely outcome of Melanoma. The prognosis of Melanoma may include the duration of Melanoma, chances of complications of Melanoma, probable outcomes, prospects for recovery, recovery period for Melanoma, survival rates, death rates, and other outcome possibilities in the overall prognosis of Melanoma. Naturally, such forecast issues are by their nature unpredictable.

Survival rate statistics for Melanoma: The following are statistics from various sources about the survival rate for Melanoma:
  • 90% of white people survive 5 years for melanoma in the US 1992-99 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 64% of African American people survive 5 years for melanoma in the US 1992-99 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 90% survive 5 years for melanoma in the US 1992-99 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 88% of women survive five years after diagnosis of melanoma in Australia 1992-97 (Cancer Survival in Australia, 1992-97, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 92% of men survive five years after diagnosis of melanoma in Australia 1992-97 (Cancer Survival in Australia, 1992-97, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 85.1% of people with skin melanomas survive after 5 years in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
  • 27.7% of people with multiple melanomas survive after 5 years in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
  • 5-year survival rate for black people with skin melanoma is 70.3% in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
  • 5-year survival rate for people with skin melanoma is 85.1% in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
  • 5-year survival rate for white people with skin melanoma is 85.3% in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
  • 1-year survival rate for men aged 15-99 with melanoma is 91.6% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for men aged 15-99 with melanoma is 72.9% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for men aged 15-39 with melanoma is 95% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for men aged 15-39 with melanoma is 82% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for men aged 40-49 with melanoma is 92% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for men aged 40-49 with melanoma is 77% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for men aged 50-59 with melanoma is 92% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for men aged 50-59 with melanoma is 74% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for men aged 60-69 with melanoma is 90% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for men aged 60-69 with melanoma is 70% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for men aged 70-79 with melanoma is 91% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for men aged 70-79 with melanoma is 67% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for men aged 80-99 with melanoma is 85% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for men aged 80-99 with melanoma is 59% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 15-99 with melanoma is 95.7% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 15-99 with melanoma is 85.1% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 15-39 with melanoma is 98% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 15-39 with melanoma is 91% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 40-49 with melanoma is 97% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 40-49 with melanoma is 89% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 50-59 with melanoma is 96% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 50-59 with melanoma is 88% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 60-69 with melanoma is 96% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 60-69 with melanoma is 85% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 70-79 with melanoma is 94% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 70-79 with melanoma is 78% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 80-99 with melanoma is 90% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 80-99 with melanoma is 69% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)

Average life years lost from Melanoma: 18.6 years (SEER)1
Deaths from Melanoma: 7,215 deaths reported in USA 1999 for skin melanoma (NVSR Sep 2001)
Complications: see complications of Melanoma

Prognosis of Melanoma discussion: Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is highly curable when found in its earliest stages. Surgical removal of thin melanomas can cure the disease in most cases. The thicker the melanoma, the lower the survival rate. 2

Melanoma can be cured if it is diagnosed and treated when the tumor is thin and has not deeply invaded the skin. However, if a melanoma is not removed at its early stages, cancer cells may grow downward from the skin surface, invading healthy tissue. When a melanoma becomes thick and deep, the disease often spreads to other parts of the body and is difficult to control.3

Recurrence of Melanoma discussion: People who have had melanoma have a high risk of developing a new melanoma.3

Prognosis for Melanoma: medical news summaries: The following medical news items are relevant to prognosis for Melanoma:



Footnotes:
1. SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2000, National Cancer Institute (NCI)
2. excerpt from Skin Cancer: NWHIC
3. excerpt from What You Need To Know About Melanoma: NCI

Last revision: June 2, 2003

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