Basic Summary for Food poisoning


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Main name of condition: Food poisoning
Other names or spellings: Foodborne diseases, Foodborne illness, Foodborne infections, foodborne illness, foodborne disease


What is Food poisoning?
  Brief description of Food poisoning: Poisoning from a substance or microbe in food.
  Parent types of Food poisoning: Sudden Digestive Conditions, Poisoning, Diseases contagious from food
  Types of Food poisoning: Typhoid fever, Botulism food poisoning, Infant botulism food poisoning, Ptomaine food poisoning, E-coli food poisoning, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella food poisoning, Campylobacter food poisoning, Shigella food poisoning, Staphylococcus aureus food poisoning, Clostridium perfringens food poisoning, Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Norwalk-like viruses, Hepatitis A, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidia, Mushroom poisoning, Toadstool poisoning, Pesticide poisoning, Marine toxins
How many people get Food poisoning?
  Incidence (annual) of Food poisoning: about 76 million cases annually in USA (NIDDK)
  Incidence Rate of Food poisoning: approx 1 in 3 or 27.94% or 76 million people in USA [about data]
  Prevalance of Food poisoning: Although most foodborne infections are undiagnosed and unreported, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that every year about 76 million people in the United States become ill from pathogens in food. Of these, up to 5,000 die. 1 ... An estimated 76 million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States.2 ... Estimated to cause 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,200 deaths in the United States each year.3
How serious is Food poisoning?
  Deaths for Food poisoning: about 5,000 annually in USA (NIDDK)
  Complications of Food poisoning: see complications of Food poisoning
What causes Food poisoning?
  Causes of Food poisoning: see causes of Food poisoning
  Risk factors for Food poisoning: see risk factors for Food poisoning
What are the symptoms of Food poisoning?
  Symptoms of Food poisoning: see symptoms of Food poisoning
Can anyone else get Food poisoning?
  More information: see contagiousness of Food poisoning
How is it treated?
  Treatments for Food poisoning: see treatments for Food poisoning
  Prevention of Food poisoning: see prevention of Food poisoning
Society issues for Food poisoning
  Costs of Food poisoning: $5 to $6 billion (NIAID)
  Costs of Food poisoning: Foodborne illness is also extremely costly. Researchers estimate that the yearly cost of all foodborne diseases in this country is $5 to $6 billion in direct medical expenses and lost productivity. Infections with the bacteria Salmonella and Campylobacter alone account for $1 billion in direct and indirect medical costs. 4
  Hospitalization statistics for Food poisoning: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Food poisoning:
  • 0.001% (168) of hospital consultant episodes were for bacterial foodborne intoxications in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 80% of hospital consultant episodes for bacterial foodborne intoxications required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 48% of hospital consultant episodes for bacterial foodborne intoxications were for bacterial foodborne intoxications men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 52% of hospital consultant episodes for bacterial foodborne intoxications were for bacterial foodborne intoxications women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 93% of hospital consultant episodes for bacterial foodborne intoxications required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6.7 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for bacterial foodborne intoxications in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for bacterial foodborne intoxications in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 44 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for bacterial foodborne intoxications in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 52% of hospital consultant episodes for bacterial foodborne intoxications occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 19% of hospital consultant episodes for bacterial foodborne intoxications occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1% of hospital consultant episodes for bacterial foodborne intoxications were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.002% (892) of hospital bed days were for bacterial foodborne intoxications in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.0003% (35) of hospital consultant episodes were for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 91% of hospital consultant episodes for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 46% of hospital consultant episodes for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 54% of hospital consultant episodes for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 97% of hospital consultant episodes for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1.2 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 49 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 63% of hospital consultant episodes for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 14% of hospital consultant episodes for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0% of hospital consultant episodes for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.0001% (42) of hospital bed days were for toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)


Footnotes:
1. excerpt from Bacteria and Foodborne Illness: NIDDK
2. excerpt from Foodborne Infections General: DBMD
3. excerpt from Foodborne Infections: DBMD
4. excerpt from Foodborne Diseases, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID

Last revision: May 27, 2003

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