Prevalence and Incidence of Cancer


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About prevalence and incidence statistics: The term 'prevalence' of Cancer usually refers to the estimated population of people who are managing Cancer at any given time. The term 'incidence' of Cancer refers to the annual diagnosis rate, or the number of new cases of Cancer diagnosed each year. Hence, these two statistics types can differ: a short-lived disease like flu can have high annual incidence but low prevalence, but a life-long disease like diabetes has a low annual incidence but high prevalence. For more information see about prevalence and incidence statistics.

Incidence (annual) of Cancer: 1,248,900 annual cases (SEER 2002 estimate)
Incidence Rate: approx 1 in 217 or 0.46% or 1.2 million people in USA [about data]
Lifetime risk for Cancer: about 1 in 3 lifetime risk; 38% of women and 43% of men (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)

Prevelance statistics about Cancer: The following statistics relate to the prevalence of Cancer:

  • 6.9% of noninstitutionalised adults have had cancer at some time in their life in the US 2001 (Summary Health Statistics for US Adults, 2002, NCHS, CDC)
  • 67,100 home health care patients had cancer as a primary diagnosis in the US 2000 (National Home and Hospice Care Survey, NCHS, CDC)
  • 5% of home health care patients had cancer as a primary diagnosis in the US 2000 (National Home and Hospice Care Survey, NCHS, CDC)
  • 54,900 hospice care patients had cancer as a primary diagnosis in the US 2000 (National Home and Hospice Care Survey, NCHS, CDC)
  • 52% of hospice care patients had cancer as a primary diagnosis in the US 2000 (National Home and Hospice Care Survey, NCHS, CDC)
  • 146,700 nursing home care patients were discharged with cancer as a primary diagnosis in the US 1999 (National Nursing Home Survey: 1999 Summary, NCHS, CDC)
  • 5.8% of nursing home care patients were discharged with cancer as a primary diagnosis in the US 1999 (National Nursing Home Survey: 1999 Summary, NCHS, CDC)
  • The average length of stay for patients with cancer as a primary diagnosis at nursing homes was 135.7 days in the US 1999 (National Nursing Home Survey: 1999 Summary, NCHS, CDC)
  • 0.5% of cancer cases were children in the UK 2001 (National Statistics, UK Government Census, 2001)
  • 58% with cancer are over 65 in Canada 1998 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
  • 38% of women will get cancer during their lifetime in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 43% of men will get cancer during their lifetime in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 2.4% of men have been diagnosed with cancer within the last 15 years in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 2.6% of women have been diagnosed with cancer within the last 15 years in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 8927 male cases in New Zealand 1999 (New Zealand Health Information, 2002)
  • 7863 female cases in New Zealand 1999 (New Zealand Health Information, 2002)
  • 16,790 cases in New Zealand 1999 (New Zealand Health Information, 2002)
  • 259 cases in New Zealand 1998-99 (New Zealand Health Information, 2002)
  • 354.1 per 100,000 male population in New Zealand (New Zealand Health Information, 2002)
  • 286.3 per 100,000 female population in New Zealand (New Zealand Health Information, 2002)
  • 133 new cases in children under 14 in New Zealand (New Zealand Health Information, 2002)
  • 1 in 4 Australian women will be diagnosed with cancer by the time they are 75 (AIHW & AACR, 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)

Incidence statistics about Cancer: The following statistics relate to the incidence of Cancer:

  • Estimated 132,700 new cases of cancer in African Americans in America 2003 (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • Estimated 63,100 new cases of cancer in African Americans in America 2003 (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 555.9 white men per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 696.8 African American men per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 392.0 Asian American and Pacific Islander men per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 259 American Indian and Alaska Native men per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 419.3 Hispanic Latino men per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 431.8 white women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 406.3 African American women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 306.9 Asian American and Pacific Islander women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 229.2 American Indian and Alaska Native women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • 312.2 Hispanic Latino women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • Cancer incidence statistics for Canada:
    • Estimated 145,500 new cases of cancer in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
    • 75% of new cases of cancer in men occurs in those over 60 in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
    • 63% of new cases of cancer in women occurs in those over 60 in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
    • 361 per 100,000 new cases of cancer in women in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
    • 449 per 100,000 new cases of cancer in men in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
    • 74,300 new cases of cancer in men in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
    • 70,700 new cases of cancer in women in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
    • 1,300 children annually in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • Cancer incidence statistics for men in various countries:
    • 369.2 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in the US 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 330.2 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in the Canada 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 326.9 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in the Czech Republic 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 277 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Denmark 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 276.9 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in China 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 272.4 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Japan 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 266.6 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in UK 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 259.4 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Poland 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 243.7 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Sweden 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 224.7 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Singapore 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 192.2 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Colombia 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 114.8 male cases per 100,000 population of cancer in India 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
  • Cancer incidence statistics for women in various countries:
    • 279.1 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in the US 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 272.2 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Denmark 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 258.7 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in the Canada 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 235.3 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Sweden 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 234.7 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Czech Republic 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 226 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in UK 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 211.9 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Poland 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 199.2 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Colombia 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 196.3 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in China 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 185.1 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Singapore 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 154.6 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in Japan 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 121.0 female cases per 100,000 population of cancer in India 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
  • Incidence statistics for various countries:
    • 330.2 new male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Canada 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 266.6 new male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in UK, England 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 363.3 new male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Italy, Venetian Region 1993-96 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 272.4 new male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Japan, Osaka Prefecture 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 312.4 new male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in The Netherlands 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 345.9 new male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in New Zealand 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 485.5 new black male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in the USA 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 364.5 new white male cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in the USA 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 258.7 new female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Canada 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 226.0 new female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in UK, England 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 236.9 new female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Italy, Venetian Region 1993-96 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 154.6 new female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Japan, Osaka Prefecture 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 240.9 new female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in The Netherlands 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 275.9 new female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in New Zealand 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 273.5 new black female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in the USA 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 284.6 new white female cases of cancer occurred per 100,000 population in the USA 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Australia has the fourth highest rate of incidence of cancer for men (IARC, 2001, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Australia has the fourth highest rate of incidence of cancer for men (IARC, 2001, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Estimated 459,000 new cases of cancer annually in Australia 2000 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, estimated 297 per 100,000 population new cases of cancer in women in Australia (AIHW & AACR, 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, estimated 39,296 new cases of cancer in women in Australia (AIGW & AACR, 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, estimated 45,935 new cases cancer in men in Australia (AIGW & AACR, 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, estimated 536 per 100,000 population new cases of cancer in men in Australia (AIHW & AACR, 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)

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