Statistics about Breast Cancer


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About statistics: This page presents a variety of statistics about Breast Cancer. The term 'prevalence' of Breast Cancer usually refers to the estimated population of people who are managing Breast Cancer at any given time. The term 'incidence' of Breast Cancer refers to the annual diagnosis rate, or the number of new cases of Breast Cancer diagnosed each year. Hence, these two statistics types can differ: a short-lived disease like flu can have high annual incidence but low prevalence, but a life-long disease like diabetes has a low annual incidence but high prevalence. For more information see about prevalence and incidence statistics.

Prevalence and incidence statistics for Breast Cancer: (see also prevalence and incidence page for Breast Cancer)
  Incidence (annual) of Breast Cancer: 205,000 annual cases (SEER 2002 estimate); 180,000 annual cases (NCI); only about 1,000 men
  Incidence Rate: approx 1 in 1,326 or 0.08% or 205,000 people in USA [about data]
  Undiagnosed prevalence of Breast Cancer: estimated 1 million
  Undiagnosed prevalence rate: approx 1 in 272 or 0.37% or 1 million people in USA [about data]
  Lifetime risk for Breast Cancer: 1 in 8 women lifetime risk in USA (NWHIC); 1 in 11 women will develop breast cancer during their lifetime in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  Incidence of Breast Cancer: More than 180,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year.1
  Prevelance statistics about Breast Cancer: The following statistics relate to the prevalence of Breast Cancer:
  • 34,000 women in the UK 2001 (National Statistics - UK Government Census, 2001)
  • 31% of cancer cases in women are breast cancer in the UK 2001 (National Statistics - UK Government Census, 2001)
  • 1 in 8 women lifetime risk in USA (NWHIC)
  • 1 in 11 women will develop breast cancer during their lifetime in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)

  Incidence statistics about Breast Cancer: The following statistics relate to the incidence of Breast Cancer:
  • 217,440 new cases for breast cancer in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 1,450 new male cases for breast cancer in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 215,990 new female cases for breast cancer in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • higher incidence rate than lung cancer in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 1 in 8 lifetime risk for women in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • estimated 203,500 new cases in women in the US 2002 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 110 cases per 100,000 women in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Breast cancer incidence statistics for racial subgroups:
    • 140.8 white women per 100,000 for breast cancer in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 121.7 African American women per 100,000 for breast cancer in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 97.2 Asian American and Pacific Islander women per 100,000 for breast cancer in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 58 American Indian and Alaska Native women per 100,000 for breast cancer in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 89.8 Hispanic Latino women per 100,000 for breast cancer in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
  • Breast cancer incidence statistics for women in various countries:
    • 89.5 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in the US 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 81.3 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in Denmark 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 78.5 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in Canada 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 76.6 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in Sweden 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 74.4 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in the UK 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 53.7 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in Poland 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 52.9 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in the Czech Republic 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 43.5 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in Singapore 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 37.3 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in Colombia 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 36.2 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in China 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 28.9 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in India 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 28.0 women per 100,000 population with breast cancer in Japan 1993-97 (Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, CCDP, Health Canada)
    • 64.7 new cases per 100,000 population in Argentina 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 72.7 new cases per 100,000 population in the Bahamas 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 79.5 new cases per 100,000 population in Barbados 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • new cases per 100,000 population in 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 36.6 new cases per 100,000 population in Belize 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 26.6 new cases per 100,000 population in Bolivia 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 46.3 new cases per 100,000 population in Brazil 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • new cases per 100,000 population in 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 81.8 new cases per 100,000 population in Canada 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 38 new cases per 100,000 population in Chile 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 33 new cases per 100,000 population in Colombia 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 28.3 new cases per 100,000 population in Costa Rica 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 34.3 new cases per 100,000 population in Cuba 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 24.6 new cases per 100,000 population in the Dominican Republic 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 24 new cases per 100,000 population in Ecuador 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 12.9 new cases per 100,000 population in El Salvador 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 36.6 new cases per 100,000 population in Guatemala 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 34.2 new cases per 100,000 population in Guyana 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 4.7 new cases per 100,000 population in Haiti 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 36.6 new cases per 100,000 population in Jamaica 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 38.4 new cases per 100,000 population in Martinique 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 23.1 new cases per 100,000 population in Mexico 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 23.1 new cases per 100,000 population in Nicaragua 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 37.9 new cases per 100,000 population in Panama 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 29 new cases per 100,000 population in Paraguay 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 30.3 new cases per 100,000 population in Peru 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 46.3 new cases per 100,000 population in Puerto Rico 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 29.7 new cases per 100,000 population in Suriname 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 64.5 new cases per 100,000 population in Trinidad and Tobago 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 91.4 new cases per 100,000 population in the US 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 80 new cases per 100,000 population in Uruguay 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
    • 36 new cases per 100,000 population in Venezuela 2000 (Regional Core Health Data Initiative, Pan American Health Organisation, 2003)
  • Breast cancer is the most often diagnosed cancer for women in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 21,200 new cases of breast cancer in women in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 106 per 100,000 new cases of breast cancer in women in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 301 new female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population aged 20-74 in Australia 2000 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Incidence statistics by state in Australia:
    • 110.9 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in New South Wales 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 114.5 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Victoria 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 113.6 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Queensland 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 111.5 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Western Australia 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 115.4 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in South Australia 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 101.2 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Tasmania 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 118 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Australian Capital Territory 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 93.1 new female cases of breast cancer occurred per 100,000 population in Northern Territory 2000 (AIHW & AACR 2003, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Incidence statistics for various countries:
    • 78.5 new female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in Canada 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 74.4 new female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in UK, England 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 74.7 new female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in Italy, Venetian Region 1993-96 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 27.9 new female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in Japan, Osaka Prefecture 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 85.6 new female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in The Netherlands 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 75.8 new female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in New Zealand 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 83.1 new black female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in the USA 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 92.1 new white female cases of breast cancer per 100,000 population in the USA 1993-97 (Parkin et al 2002, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 11,314 new cases of breast cancer occurred in women in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Breast cancer accounted for 28.8% of all new cases of female cancer in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Breast cancer accounted for 115.3 new female cases per 100,000 population in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)

Death and mortality statistics for Breast Cancer:
  Deaths from Breast Cancer: 41,100 deaths in 1999 (CDC); 41,528 deaths reported in USA 1999 (NVSR Sep 2001)
  Death statistics for Breast Cancer: The following are statistics from various sources about deaths and Breast Cancer:
  • 40,580 estimated deaths for breast cancer in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 470 estimated male deaths for breast cancer in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Breast cancer ranked 2nd leading cancer killer in women in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 40,110 estimated female deaths for breast cancer in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Breast cancer death rate decreased by 5.6% in the US 1990-94 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Estimated 39,600 deaths in women in the US 2002 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 41,809 people died from breast cancer each year in the US 2001 (Deaths: Final Data for 2001, NCHS, CDC)
  • Breast cancer death statistics by racial group in the USA:
    • 27.2 white women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 35.9 African American women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 12.5 Asian American and Pacific Islander women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 14.9 American Indian and Alaska Native women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 17.9 Hispanic Latino women per 100,000 in the US 1996-2000 (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, National Cancer Institute, 1975-2000)
    • 11.8 per 100,000 American Indian or Alaska Native people died from breast cancer in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
    • 16.3 per 100,000 Hispanic/Latino died from breast cancer in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
    • 17.7 per 100,000 Asian/Pacific Islander died from breast cancer in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
    • 25.5 per 100,000 white people died from breast cancer in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
    • Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women in the US (NIH, The National Women’s Health Centre, 2004)
  • 26.0 per 100,000 women died from breast cancer in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 29.1 per 100,000 people died from breast cancer in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 34.4 per 100,000 black people died from breast cancer in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 24 per 100,000 deaths from breast cancer in women in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 5,200 deaths from breast cancer in women in Canada 2004 (Canadian Cancer Statistics, National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2004)
  • 2,698 women died from breast cancer in Australia 2002 (AIHW National Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 4.2% of all female deaths was due to breast cancer in Australia 2002 (AIHW National Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 59 women aged 20-74 per 100,000 population die of breast cancer in Australia 2002 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Breast cancer caused 2,521 female deaths in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Breast cancer accounted for 16.3% of female cancer deaths in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Breast cancer caused 24.7 female deaths per 100,000 population in Australia 2000 (AIHW and AACR, AIHW National Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)

  Survival rate for Breast Cancer: 78% survival rate in the UK 2001 (National Statistics – UK Government Census, 2001)
  Survival rate statistics for Breast Cancer: The following are statistics from various sources about the survival rate for Breast Cancer:
  • 80.4% of women with breast cancer survive after 5 years in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
  • Breast cancer survival rates by stage of disease:
    • 100% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected before it starts to spread in the US (The American Cancer Society)
    • 98% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected while it is smaller than 2cm in diameter and hasn’t spread in the US (The American Cancer Society)
    • 88% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected while it is 2-5cm in diameter and has spread to axillary lymph nodes in the US (The American Cancer Society)
    • 76% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected even over 5cm in diameter if it hasn’t spread to axillary lymph nodes in the US (The American Cancer Society)
    • 76% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected while it is 2-5cm in diameter and has spread to axillary lymph nodes in the US (The American Cancer Society)
    • 56% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected after it has spread to axillary lymph nodes and to axillary tissues in the US (The American Cancer Society)
    • 49% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected after it has attached itself to the chest wall and chest lymph nodes in the US (The American Cancer Society)
    • 16% of women survive breast cancer if it is detected after it has spread to other parts of the body such as bone, lung or liver in the US (The American Cancer Society)
  • Overall breast cancer survival rates by racial subgroups:
    • 5-year survival rate for black women with breast cancer is 65.8% in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
    • 5-year survival rate for white women with breast cancer is 81.6% in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
    • 5-year survival rate for women with breast cancer is 80.4% in the US 1983-90 (SEER)
    • 83% of women aged 20-74 survive five years after breast cancer diagnosis in Australia 1992-97 (Cancer Survival in Australia, 1992-97, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
    • 88% of white people survive 5 years in the US 1992-99 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
    • 74% of African American people survive 5 years in the US 1992-99 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
    • 87% survive 5 years in the US 1992-99 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
    • 79% for 5 year survival if under 45 years old in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
    • 84% for 5 year survival if 45-64 years old in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
    • 87% for 5 year survival if over 65 years old in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
    • 5 year survival rate lower for Hispanic women than Caucasian women in the US (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 15-99 with breast cancer is 91.1% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 15-99 with breast cancer is 72.8% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 15-39 with breast cancer is 96% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 15-39 with breast cancer is 71% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 40-49 with breast cancer is 96% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 40-49 with breast cancer is 78% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 50-59 with breast cancer is 96% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 50-59 with breast cancer is 81% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 60-69 with breast cancer is 93% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 60-69 with breast cancer is 78% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 70-79 with breast cancer is 87% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 70-79 with breast cancer is 68% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 1-year survival rate for women aged 80-99 with breast cancer is 77% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 5-year survival rate for women aged 80-99 with breast cancer is 51% in England and Wales 1991-95 (Cancer Survival, National Statistics)
  • 18 months is the median survival for patients with advanced breast cancer at time of diagnosis (Cancer, Vol 2, No. 8: 2211-2219, American Cancer Society)
  • 26 months is the median survival for patients with advanced breast cancer who are still alive two years after diagnosis (Cancer, Vol 2, No. 8: 2211-2219, American Cancer Society)
  • 3.5 years is the median survival for patients with advanced breast cancer who are still alive five years after diagnosis (Cancer, Vol 2, No. 8: 2211-2219, American Cancer Society)

  Average life years lost for Breast Cancer: 18.6 years (SEER)2
Society statistics for Breast Cancer
  Cost statistics for Breast Cancer: The following are statistics from various sources about costs and Breast Cancer:
  • $96.1 million spent on breast cancer in Australia 2000-01(Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)

  Hospitalization statistics for Breast Cancer: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Breast Cancer:
  • 17,321 admissions to public hospitals for procedures on breast diseases in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 27,688 admissions to private hospitals for procedures on breast in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 39.4% of hospitalisations for procedures on breast were single day in private hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 45.5% of hospitalisations for procedures on breast diseases were single day in public hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 47,375 patient days spent in public hospitals for procedures on breasts in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 63,337 patient days spent in private hospitals were for procedures on breasts in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 0.89% (113,860) of hospital episodes were for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 98% of hospital consultations for malignant neoplasm of breast required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1% of hospital episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 99% of hospital episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6% of hospital admissions for malignant neoplasm of breast required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6.3 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 4 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 56 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 63% of hospitalisations for malignant neoplasm of breast occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 9% of hospitalisations for malignant neoplasm of breast occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 59% of hospitalisations for malignant neoplasm of breast were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.51% (269,366) of hospital bed days were for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1.5 million visits to a hospital outpatient department was due to mammogram in the US 2002 (National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2002, NCHS, CDC)
  • 0.89% (113,860) of hospital consultant episodes were for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 98% of hospital consultant episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1% of hospital consultant episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 99% of hospital consultant episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6% of hospital consultant episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6.3 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 4 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 56 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 63% of hospital consultant episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 9% of hospital consultant episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 59% of hospital consultant episodes for malignant neoplasm of breast were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.51% (269,366) of hospital bed days were for malignant neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.059% (7,563) of hospital consultant episodes were for benign neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 100% of hospital consultant episodes for benign neoplasm of breast required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1% of hospital consultant episodes for benign neoplasm of breast were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 99% of hospital consultant episodes for benign neoplasm of breast were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0% of hospital consultant episodes for benign neoplasm of breast required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1.6 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for benign neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for benign neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 39 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for benign neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 90% of hospital consultant episodes for benign neoplasm of breast occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 2% of hospital consultant episodes for benign neoplasm of breast occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 71% of hospital consultant episodes for benign neoplasm of breast were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.007% (3,392) of hospital bed days were for benign neoplasm of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.036% (4,570) of hospital consultant episodes were for carcinoma in situ of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 99% of hospital consultant episodes for carcinoma in situ of breast required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1% of hospital consultant episodes for carcinoma in situ of breast were men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 99% of hospital consultant episodes for carcinoma in situ of breast were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1% of hospital consultant episodes for carcinoma in situ of breast required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 3.6 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for carcinoma in situ of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 3 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for carcinoma in situ of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 57 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for carcinoma in situ of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 63% of hospital consultant episodes for carcinoma in situ of breast occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 5% of hospital consultant episodes for carcinoma in situ of breast occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 19% of hospital consultant episodes for carcinoma in situ of breast were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.025% (13,322) of hospital bed days were for carcinoma in situ of breast in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • Hospitalization statistics in Australia:
    • 1.05% (41,746) of hospital episodes were for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast in public hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 58% of hospitalisations for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast were single day episodes in public hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 85% of hospitalisations in public hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast were by public patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 15% of hospitalisations in public hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast were by private patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Hospitalisations for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast at public hospitals occurred in 21.4 people per 10,000 population in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 3 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast in public hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Excluding same day episodes, 5.7 days was the mean length of stay in public hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 2.56% (62,082) of private hospital episodes were for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 69% of hospitalisations in private hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast were single day episodes in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 2% of hospitalisations in private hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast were by public patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 98% of hospitalisations in private hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast were by private patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Hospitalisations in private hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast occurred in 31.8 people per 10,000 population in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 2 days was the mean length of stay in private hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Excluding same day episodes, 4.4 days was the mean length of stay in private hospitals for cancer of bone, connective tissue and breast in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
  • Hospitalization statistics in Australia for public hospitals:
    • 0.16% (30) of hospital episodes for breast cancer in public hospitals occurred in females aged 5 to 14 years in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 31% (6,426) of hospital episodes for breast cancer in public hospitals occurred in females aged 15 to 24 years in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 55.95% (11,611) of hospital episodes for breast cancer in public hospitals occurred in females aged 25 to 34 years in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 12.9% (2,669) of hospital episodes for breast cancer in public hospitals occurred in females aged 35 to 44 years in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 0.07% (14) of hospital episodes for breast cancer in public hospitals occurred in females aged 45 to 54 years in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
'

Footnotes:
1. excerpt from What You Need To Know About Breast Cancer: NCI
2. SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2000, National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Last revision: April 9, 2003

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